28/11/2014

Minor Injuries Unit To Remain Open

A Minor Injuries Unit (MIU) in Bangor is to remain open, it has been announced.

Health Minister Jim Wells confirmed the news earlier today (28 November).

Last month, the facility was one of three MIUs earmarked for closure due to increasing cuts being placed on the health budget. However, Minister Wells has now said the unit will stay open to relieve the pressure on hospital emergency departments.

MIUs treat injuries that are not life-threatening, such as broken bones, burns, bites, wounds, minor head injuries and other less serious ailments.

In a statement, the minister said he was "mindful that the winter months place greater demands on our Emergency Departments and acute hospitals."

He continued: "A significant amount of work has taken place regionally to strengthen performance at our Emergency Departments, and I wish to avoid where possible adding to the numbers coming through the front door of these Emergency Departments.

"I have asked the South Eastern Trust to ensure the Minor Injuries Unit at Bangor Hospital remains open. This will lessen the numbers attending other units including the busy Ulster Hospital Emergency Department.

"Bangor Minor Injuries Unit deals with about 10,000 attendances annually and its closure would have offered up only minimal financial savings."

(JP)

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